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WRLWNDradio is a weekly compilation of the hot topics, industry trends, new tech, and your source for informative interviews with todays tech experts. WRLWNDradio is the weekly podcast for wrlwnd.com and itincanadaonline.ca.
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Now displaying: Page 17
Mar 13, 2018

In this episode, have you ever stopped to think who is the author of the news you're reading, is it a human or an AI? And with the race to driverless cars heating up, there are some ethical and moral questions that need to be answered, like unemployment and who should be held responsible for an accident.

In the not so distant future, we will receive the news in a version that is more suitable to our liking, written entirely by artificial intelligence. 

One may argue that journalists will still be around. And that's true, but journalists might still report on events, but it will be AI that will take these inputs, inject data from its vast historical data and formulate a multitude of different themes, each making different arguments and coming to different conclusions.

Then, using data about readers' interests learned from their social media, online shopping and browsing history, AI will present them with the version of the news they would like to read. 

Driverless cars

At Mobile World Congress, where the top companies in mobile normally meet to showcase their latest line of phones, it is worthwhile to note that it is now becoming a place where executives from the car industry are showing up in large numbers.

Given the growth of technology and how that is being integrated into cars, carmakers have no choice but to stay with the pack or risk being left behind. That is why more and more executives from the car industry are making their way to events like Mobile World Congress and other tech conferences. 

Regarding moral concerns: The first issue is unemployment caused by a disruptive technology that could put millions of truck and taxi drivers out of work; the second, who will be held responsible when things go wrong.

False News 

According to a new study examining the flow of stories on Twitter, people, prefer false news.

As a result, false news travels faster, farther and deeper through the social network than true news.

The researchers, from the MIT, found that those patterns applied to every subject they studied, not only politics and urban legends but also business, science and technology.

False claims were 70 percent more likely than the truth to be shared on Twitter. True stories were rarely retweeted by more than 1,000 people, but the top 1 percent of false stories were

routinely shared by 1,000 to 100,000 people. And it took true stories about six times as long as false ones to reach 1,500 people.

Researchers identified more than 80,000 posts on Twitter that contained false claims and stories. Combined, those posts were retweeted millions of times.

Mar 5, 2018

A software to identifying gang related crimes faster, and Equifax is back in the news

In this episode, a new software that can help police identify gang crimes faster. Are you the master or slave of your phone? Marcello Sukhdeo shares some tips on how to become the master, and Equifax confirmed another 2.4 million records were breached and not previously reported.

Show Notes:

A new algorithm is being tried which automates the process of identifying gang crimes. But this has come under some criticism where scientists have warned that far from reducing gang violence, this program could do the opposite by eroding trust in communities, or it could brand innocent people as gang members.

For years, scientists have been using computer algorithms to map criminal networks, or to guess where and when future crimes might take place, a practice known as predictive policing. But little work has been done on labeling past crimes as gang-related.

In this new work, researchers developed a system that can identify a crime as gang-related based on only four pieces of information: the primary weapon, the number of suspects, and the neighborhood and location where the crime took place.

Slave or Master?

Samsung’s head of mobile in the UK said: “We need to return to being the masters of our technology and stop being slaves to our phones.”

Many studies have shown that both the young and old alike are becoming increasingly addicted to smartphones, social media and the constant need for messaging.

“Let’s not spend our life looking at these devices. You look around and everyone is doing it, leaning over [their] phones. Let’s make the device be the slave and we’ll be the master - let’s turn the roles completely on their head.”

Now the way that he says this can be done is leverage their vast portfolio of devices, from fridges to cookers, vacuums and TVs, as well as its SmartThings, Internet of Things platform, to shift the game towards a more intelligent, connected future that frees us from phone obsession.

Equifax is back in the news

Last month, reports surfaced that more information than previously thought may have been exposed in Equifax's massive data breach and this week, the has company confirmed it. Along with the 145.5 million individuals already reported to have been affected by the breach, Equifax says another 2.4 million were as well.

Now to play this down, the interim CEO of Equifax said that:

"This is not about newly discovered stolen data. It's about sifting through the previously identified stolen data, analyzing other information in our databases that was not taken by the attackers and making connections that enabled us to identify additional individuals."

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